Te DA! Designing a Tam o' Shanter

One imagines it is one's IMPATIENCE that restrains one from even taking a glancing interest in written instruction.

Much faster to just push all the buttons in a random sequence on the new dishwasher until The Bloke takes charge and reads the manual.  Much faster.  And even worth him feeling momentarily superior while one takes instruction from him. 

And with the lack of someone to demonstrate, learning by DOING is the next best thing.  But there's the rub.  Learning by doing is not really learning by doing at all.  It is more learning by UNdoing and can take a very long time.


Like this Fair Isle Tam o' Shanter.  Undone over and over.  For hours and hours.  Days even.  Days and red wine nights.  Twenty five very bad drawings. Two hundred and five knitted prototypes.  But not a not a 'poo bum wee!' anywhere.  Nothing. 

One was like a pig in mud.  Yep a pig in mud.

OK.  So one DID open this book by Sheila McGregor: Traditional Fair Isle Knitting - but only to look at the pictures and wonder at the genius of decreasing the stitches while increasing the pattern.

But of course these Tam o' Shanters are knit from the base up, not from the top down as has become one's favoured directions in all things knitted in the round.

At this rate one is going to need a second head.

(Shuddup Jules!  I have NOT already got two heads!)

Comments

Anonymous said…
Gawd you is so clever Darlin- l wouldnt even attempt it- but then one would never learn, would one..l`m having enuf trouble at mo trying to cotton onto a new crochet stitch.Trying to make a tote bag for practice.Pulled it undone quite a few times.. So keep practising, thats what the experts tells me.. Regards, Hahnsmum..of Downtown Bingara..
grrl + dog said…
goes to show that knitting is indeed a meditation, and maybe we learn patience

along the way
Strickbombe said…
first argyle, then fair isle! where is one going with this? hound's tooth? glen check?
Knit 'n' Stitch said…
Full marks for persistence and patience. Your 25 sketches ahead of me. For whatever reason I can't get my head around drawing a sketch of the pattern/garment. BUT when it comes to fair isle, intarsia and the like, I prefer to follow a chart rather than written pattern ;-).
Ginga Squid said…
You are getting very technical in your knitting my dearie - all looking far too complicated.
I can't believe you have a bloke who actually reads manuals for things - nice one!
lynne h said…
ha!! one does leave opening the book/instructions 'til the very end, doesn't one? last resort and all that...

xoxo

ha again! word verification is 'humbl'
Robyn said…
you make me laugh, feel very normal and inspire all in the same sentence.

happy go nuts knitting

Ps... i for the first time picked up circular needles and knitted my very first teapot hat.
ParisMaddy said…
amazing. you ARE clever. Love your Blog.
Luvvie said…
Bloody Norah! I don't see you for a couple of days and look what you get up to ..... such a clever possum you are...
elsiee said…
i am in awe of knitters and even more in awe of learners by doing and undoing... that gene skipped me over in a VERY big way...
Well done! I like this. I like it a lot. I like the movement in the spiral.
And I do like the Neapolitan icecream colour scheme.
lilly piri said…
But it looks wonderful! Or am I missing something?
jwami said…
Wow! Such staying power. The stuff of queens.
pinkviolets said…
This is gorgeous, I want one!!!!!!
ROZ said…
Aw, that design's so lovely. I love the colors, too.
Purl Buttons said…
So impressive! Have you planned the band or have you decided to continue one step at a time?

My husband calls all manuals "Indirections" and my friend's husband calls them "Destructions"
Jacqui said…
um...what's a tam o'shanter?
Robin said…
Ooh will this lead to some written instructions those of us who are addicted them (and the time they save) will be able to follow? I do do do hope so!
Grand Purl Baa said…
Jacqui
The Tam o’ Shanter is a Scottish bonnet worn by men.However, women have adopted a form of this hat known as a “Tam” or a “Tammy.” The hat is usually made of wool and has a toorie (pom-pon) in the centre. It is a floppy type of hat with the crown sometimes twice the diameter of the head. Named after Tam o' Shanter, a character in the poem of that name by Robert Burns
WIKIPEDIA.

Robyn
You might have to wait for book FOUR!

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